Tips

Orientation

Good Group Tips

In principle, orienting new people to your group prevents conflict and improves creativity. When new people come in without a solid understanding of the group’s purpose and how things are done, there will be mismatched expectations and then conflict. Good orientation ensures we are all on the same page headed in the same direction.

Orientation can foster a sense of belonging and provide structure for creative contributions. Alternatively, it can reveal a lack of fit and indicate “let’s not go through with it.” Both outcomes are valuable.

Practical Tip: Be deliberate about orienting new members. Do not assume that a new member knows what the group is about, how things are done, and what is planned for the future. Provide each new member with information about the group’s purpose, strategic direction, and expectations for member behavior. Someone should spend one-on-one time with every new member.

Provide honest answers to questions even if it might turn someone away.

Be clear about where the group is headed and sincere about the invitation to come along.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

How to move forward

Good Group Tips

In principle, when stuck, the most important question is not “Why are we stuck?” or “Whose fault is it?” but “How to move forward in a positive, peaceful way?” Probably this requires an attitude change: a choice to see things differently and imagine things better or a decision to let go of something. Probably it also requires creative thinking about next steps that could be taken in spite of the situation or attitudes of others. And it requires doing something, not just wishing.

Practical Tip: If moving forward is important to you and your group, take a step no matter how small. Don’t get bogged down complaining about the situation or trying to figure out why things are the way they are. Rather, accept the situation and say, “Okay, now what to do?” Find a way. Go around. Make new partners. Try something different. Get out and push.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Difference between launch and land

Good Group Tips

In principle, it helps to take ownership of what I hear, which may be different from what the speaker intended. Messages often get changed between how they are launched and how they land. The person talking often means one thing yet the person listening often hears it differently. This is due to differences in culture and context. It is nobody’s fault.

When I begin a sentence with “I heard,” rather than “You said,” it acknowledges that I might not have heard it the way you intended. Speaking from my own perspective, using “I messages,” is disarming, safe, nonjudgmental, humble.

Practical Tip: Don’t tell someone what they said, what they launched. Rather, use your own words to describe what you heard, how the words landed on you. This allows the speaker to clarify any difference between launch and land, which furthers understanding, which contributes to good group decisions.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for a one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
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