Efficiency

Opt out

Good Group Tips

In principle, there are many things out of my control but, for most of us, within my control is how I spend my time and money. I get to decide what to participate in and what to opt out of. I cannot control a television show but I can opt out of watching it. I cannot control how a consumer product is made but I can opt out of buying it.

Another choice I have when I confront something I do not like is to try to defeat it. This is doing battle, sometimes in a straight path of destruction. Opting out is a winding path.

Both fighting and opting out affect the provider of the product or message we dislike. When people in large numbers opt out of buying a product, the provider stops providing it. Boycotting is a very effective way to make good group decisions, and peaceful.

Practical Tip: Don’t opt out of agreements already made but with new choices, steer your time and money away from things you oppose. Each personal choice you make sends a message.

As a group, make choices based on participation. If people aren’t showing up or otherwise contributing to a particular activity, discontinue it.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Stakeholders at the table

Good Group Tips

In principle, stakeholders are those who have a significant stake in a particular decision; that is, they stand to win a lot, lose a lot, or they are in a position to significantly help or hinder implementation of the decision. If stakeholders don’t participate in making the decision, chances are it won’t be a good one.

Having all stakeholders “at the table” for decision making can be very challenging but it paves the way for smooth implementation. When stakeholders don’t participate in decision making, there is a good chance they will work against decision implementing.

Practical Tip: At the outset, identify stakeholders and invite their input. For the really key stakeholders, actively encourage participation, even insist on their input.

If your group is deciding something that only some other person or group can implement, that other person or group should have an opportunity to influence the decision.

It is very helpful when stakeholders at least bless the decision-making process and agree to honor it.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share. 

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
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