Creativity

At least two ways

Good Group Tips

In principle, there are at least two ways to solve every problem. When we are able to be nonjudgmental, we are able to see problems not as problems at all but as misalignments. For example, the problem is not that I am right and you are wrong, it is simply that we see things differently. The problem is not that we are spending too much, it is simply that we are spending more than we are earning. When we see difficulties as misalignments rather than problems, it is easier to see more solutions. For example, you could change your view or I could change mine. We could decrease expenses or we could increase revenues.

Practical Tip: When faced with a problem remember there are always at least two ways to solve it. See problems as misalignments, without judgment. Identify all the creative ways to achieve alignment.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Outside influence

Good Group Tips

In principle, if we want things to be different we have to see or do things differently. If a group of people are seemingly unable to solve a problem among themselves, perhaps they don’t have the wherewithal among themselves. If a group seems stuck in its ways— unenthusiastic, mediocre—perhaps it’s time for some outside influence.

Outside influences can jar things loose, knock things off track, light motivational fires; exactly what might be needed.

Practical Tip: Always bring new influences into your group: outside speakers, visitors, new information. Seek out those with special expertise and relevant experiences. Do not be threatened by outside influences; welcome them.

Outside influences can help you confirm that you are on the right track or inspire you towards a new track. Both are good.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

It’s the planning, not the plan

In this fireside video from a lodge on a lake in Maine, Craig talks about the value of having a plan vs. making a plan.

If you are a planning skeptic, check this one out.

This video has captions. To see them, click CC on the video screen.

Here’s what Craig says in the video

Hi everybody. Hey it’s Craig Freshley.

I’m about to start a meeting in this awesome room. I’m at the Kennedy Learning Center on the shores of Damariscotta Lake, right out those windows. We’re going to sit around this table and were going to make a plan.

Now a lot of people don’t like plans. A lot of people say that plans are useless. In fact, Dwight Eisenhower said, “Plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” And I get that.

Sometimes — actually most of the time — after you make a plan, circumstances change and the whole plan is no longer valid. But the process of planning is indispensable even if you don’t stick to the plan. Having gone through the effort to think through what is it that we want to achieve — what are the steps, in what order, who’s responsible for what, how much money is each step going to cost — having thought through those plans helps us later even when we have to go off the plan. Even when circumstances change; because we went through the planning process we much better know how to adapt.

So even if you think plans are obsolete I hope you agree with me that the effort of planning is indispensable.

Thanks for listening everybody.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
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