Creativity

No one dominates

Good Group Tips

In principle, the next great idea might come from anywhere, not just from the person with the most power or who talks the most. Groups seeking truly creative decisions invite and make room for creative suggestions from all participants. When naturally dominant people are humble and when naturally shy people are courageous, prospects for good group decisions are dramatically increased.

Practical Tip: If you have a strong opinion about something or recognize that you are dominating, consider even for a second that there might be a better way than yours; there might be better ideas out there worth hearing. The less you talk, the more you hear.

If you are part of a group where someone is dominating the conversation, speak up and say that you would like to hear from others. Say, “We appreciate your views but would like to hear other views also. Is there someone else who would like to weigh in on this?” In this way it’s not about shutting someone up, rather it’s about wanting to hear from others.

Appreciate and validate the dominant comments, then move on.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Stories

Good Group Tips

In principle, all stories are true and some of them really happened. Stories are kernels of truth passed on in colorful ways that help us understand the truths they contain. Most of us relate to stories much better than we relate to facts and figures. It’s not so important that a story really happened but how is the story like my story, like our story? What truth does the story contain about human experience, about our nature?

Practical Tip: Make time in your group for story telling — within meetings, before and after meetings, while sharing food. Read and hear stories of other like groups, other like people. Pass on stories that ring true for you.

It is by telling and hearing stories that we come to understanding. It is by understanding that we come to good group decisions.

PS: Like most principles among these pages, I didn’t make this one up. I heard it somewhere, added a little color, and passed it on.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Great gifts are not always new

In this super short video Craig explains that you don’t always have to do a big, new thing.  Instead, following through with what you already agreed to is often the greatest gift.

Thanks for holding the camera, Ellis!

This video has captions. To see them, click CC on the video screen.

Here’s what Craig says in the video

Hi everybody! Hey it’s Craig Freshley here.

Now, a lot of people are inspired to give to their group or give to their community. And many people even get divine messages to give some big, new, great thing; start some new initiative for their group or community. But it might be that the greatest gift you can give is to follow up on the last stuff you agreed to.

Sometimes the great gift does come from divine messaging and it’s a big new initiative. But often times the greatest thing you can do for your group is the next right thing, that’s right in front of you.

I hope this helps you help your group.

Thanks for listening everybody.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
1 2 3 10