Tips, Videos, Handouts

Incrementally

Good Group Tips

In principle, the best things are always built in tiny stages. Often there is the illusion of dramatic change, but even seemingly miraculous changes result from thousands of small steps. Taking small steps forward on a project lets us learn as we go and adjust. Big steps are risky. Small steps are sure-footed. Nature builds in very small increments and achieves very great things.

Practical Tip: Do things small before you do them big, on small stages before big stages. Make use of pilot projects, test cases, and trial runs. Make commitments incrementally. Proceed with many small steps rather than a few giant leaps. When your group wants to rush ahead asking, “What’s the biggest step we can take to achieve our objective?” ask also, “What’s the smallest step we can take?”

It is better to take a small step in what we know is the right direction than to take a large step in what might be the wrong direction.

– Craig Freshley

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At least two ways

Good Group Tips

In principle, there are at least two ways to solve every problem. When we are able to be nonjudgmental, we are able to see problems not as problems at all but as misalignments. For example, the problem is not that I am right and you are wrong, it is simply that we see things differently. The problem is not that we are spending too much, it is simply that we are spending more than we are earning. When we see difficulties as misalignments rather than problems, it is easier to see more solutions. For example, you could change your view or I could change mine. We could decrease expenses or we could increase revenues.

Practical Tip: When faced with a problem remember there are always at least two ways to solve it. See problems as misalignments, without judgment. Identify all the creative ways to achieve alignment.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Get a second

Good Group Tips

In principle, a virtue of most decision-making systems such as Robert’s Rules of Order is that for a group to consider an idea, at least two members need to think it worthy of the full group’s time. A motion needs a second in order to be considered. Requiring that I get one other person bought into my idea before taking up the full group’s time assures that the group cannot be dominated by a single person or an untested idea. Further, requiring at least one collaborator enhances creativity.

Practical Tip: Before you take your idea to the whole group, take it to at least one other person first. Be open to feedback and adaptation. Take your idea to someone who could lend credibility and help you take it to others. If initially rejected, try someone else. When at least one other respected group member believes in your idea then perhaps it is time to take it to the full group. If you cannot get at least one other person to believe in your idea, change it.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
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