Tips, Videos, Handouts

High ground

Good Group Tips

In principle, groups often get bogged down in details (who should do what by when and how) and fail to stay on the high ground (strategic direction and guiding policies).

The group as a whole has the unique perspective of seeing all that the group is doing, all the opportunities, all the threats. It is a view from the hill top. An individual group member has the unique perspective of seeing the details on the ground and has the best sense of how to actually implement policies in the field.

Practical Tip: As a group responsible for establishing plans and policies, consider the big picture and make high-level decisions that guide implementation. Resist the temptation to dictate details. Encourage the group as a whole to stay on the high ground and trust individuals to handle the trenches.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Small goals

Good Group Tips

In principle, nothing breeds success like success. Achieving few or small goals provides motivation for achieving more and bigger goals. When there is a gap between a goal and achieving it, one way to close the gap is to improve ability but another way is to make the goal smaller.

“What do you say to the team?” I asked the coach of young hockey players about to lose their seventh game in a row. “You give them small goals,” he replied, “Things they can achieve other than winning the game. Things like more shots on goal or more successful passes than in the last game.”

Practical Tip: When it looks like your group is underachieving, when morale is down, establish achievable goals and get some successes under your belt. No matter how small the victory, see what it feels like to win.

Sometimes it is okay to move the bar down. Get over it. Boost morale. Move the bar back up later.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Orientation

Good Group Tips

In principle, orienting new people to your group prevents conflict and improves creativity. When new people come in without a solid understanding of the group’s purpose and how things are done, there will be mismatched expectations and then conflict. Good orientation ensures we are all on the same page headed in the same direction.

Orientation can foster a sense of belonging and provide structure for creative contributions. Alternatively, it can reveal a lack of fit and indicate “let’s not go through with it.” Both outcomes are valuable.

Practical Tip: Be deliberate about orienting new members. Do not assume that a new member knows what the group is about, how things are done, and what is planned for the future. Provide each new member with information about the group’s purpose, strategic direction, and expectations for member behavior. Someone should spend one-on-one time with every new member.

Provide honest answers to questions even if it might turn someone away.

Be clear about where the group is headed and sincere about the invitation to come along.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.