Tips, Videos, Handouts

Okay to change your mind

Good Group Tips

In principle, leaders are often criticized for changing their minds on issues because it apparently indicates weakness, inconsistency, lack of commitment to a particular doctrine. It may indicate that one is subject to influence. Yet groups make their best decisions when every group member is subject to influence, when each one of us is open to hearing and acting on the wisdom of others and on new information.

Changing one’s mind for trivial or self-serving reasons may indicate weakness, but changing one’s mind in the face of new truths indicates growth and evolution.

Practical Tip: Know your values and morals but do not be so attached to them that they cause you to deny new truths. Be in touch with your beliefs but also open to new information and new beliefs. One of the most powerful and helpful things one can say in a meeting is, “Well, okay, I’ve changed my mind.”

The thing we can count on about our world is that it is always changing. To make good group decisions we need to be open to changing with it.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Take a break

Good Group Tips

In principle, activities that contribute to good group decisions are not always best done by the group as a whole. Often times information, ideas, and potential solutions are all put on the table in such a tangled web that the group as a whole can’t make sense of them. Other times, emotions run high in the heat of debate and cloud our ability to see clearly. Further, in the midst of lively discussion it’s often hard to discern our own thoughts and feelings.

When things are confusing and the group is in disarray, we are likely to be hugely inefficient. We repeat ourselves, spin our wheels, and make clumsy progress in wrong directions.

Practical Tip: Take a break. When a group breaks for ten minutes or overnight or puts an issue to rest until the next meeting, it gives time for things to settle out and become clear. People chat informally in small groups and develop new understanding. Group facilitators have time to organize information and proposals so that others can make sense of it all. Emotions cool and personal views become clear. Time heals.

Taking a break is often the most efficient way to proceed.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Role of the Chair Person

In this short video Craig describes two types of leaders. Which type are you?

This video has captions. To see them, click CC on the video screen.

Here’s what Craig says in the video

Hi everybody! Hey it’s Craig Freshley here. I heard a story in a meeting too good not to tell.

This guy just joined a new group. He was trying to fit in. He came back from the bathroom and learned that he had been elected group chair person. At first he was upset but then he started thinking to himself, “Hmm. Group Chair Person. Okay, well I’ll get to feel important. I’ll get to like, tell people what to do; boss people around. I’ll get all the girls.” And he sat through the rest of the meeting quietly.

Afterwards he asked somebody, “So, what are the responsibilities of the chair person anyway?” “Oh yeah, well the group chair person is the one who comes an hour early makes the coffee and sets up all the chairs.”

There’s two kinds of leaders. There is the kind of leader that wants to command people and command respect, and there’s the kind of leader that wants to serve people and serve the group cause.

Which kind of leader do you want to be? The one that bosses people around and gets all the girls or the one that makes sure each person has a seat at the table that every group member is fully supported.

Thanks for listen everybody. I hope this helps you help your group make good decisions.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
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