Tips, Videos, Handouts

Moral compass

Good Group Tips

In principle, there is something to be said for a moral compass handed down to us from our ancestors. As food customs protect us from poisoning, moral customs prevent bad things from happening.

Basic moral themes shared across cultures and continents are trustworthy guides: themes such as respect and compassion for all people, honesty, fairness, self worth, and respect for nature. Groups that consider universal morality when making decisions are more likely to make decisions that head us in good directions.

Practical Tip: Even if you are not breaking a law, or perhaps not getting caught, if you are breaking a widely shared moral code then there is a good chance that bad things will result.

When trying to decide the right thing to do, remember your moral compass…worth following when otherwise off the charts.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Last minute decision making

Good Group Tips

In principle, the more information we have about something the better decision we’re likely to make about it. And, we’re likely to have the most information at the last minute. Deciding more than we really need to at any given moment can cause regrets later.

Practical Tip: Before you start making decisions, think about the order of decisions. What needs to get decided first? What next? What can wait? Break decisions up into pieces if possible, and if there’s anything to be gained by waiting to decide a piece (like more people getting more information), wait. Establish a date certain for deciding each piece.

The last minute, although stressful, is often the optimal time for good group decisions. “I love the last minute,” I once heard someone say. “If it weren’t for the last minute a lot of stuff wouldn’t get done.”

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Consensus doesn’t mean casual

Good Group Tips

In principle, consensus generally means that all perspectives are heard and all concerns are addressed, resulting in decisions that all participants can willingly consent to. Many groups aspire to make decisions by consensus but very few have specific protocols in place to guide its implementation. There is no Robert’s Rules of Order for consensus. Groups often plunge ahead resolved to “use consensus” but with few or no structural underpinnings.

Practical Tip: If you are going to use consensus as your official decision-making method, be specific at the outset about what it means. How, specifically, will you make sure that all perspectives are heard, all concerns are addressed, and what steps will be followed when there is a “block?”  Once decided, follow your rules with a degree of formality.

Structure and protocol are just as important in consensus decision making as in any other type of decision making. Being casual about the rules just makes a mess.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

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