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Direct communication

Good Group Tips

In principle, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. When it comes to communications between two people, the shorter the better. It’s often easier to get information indirectly, and usually more fun. But indirect information is more like entertainment than fact. Direct communication builds true understanding.

Practical Tip: If you are wondering what someone thinks about something, or why they did something, or what they plan to do in the future, ask them directly. Do not speculate about it with others. Do not proceed based on assumptions. Get the story straight from the source. If you want someone to know what you think, or why you did something, or what you plan to do, tell them. Do not be silent, sneaky, or circuitous and “let them figure it out.” When you hear information indirectly like “she thinks this,” or “he said that,” know that what you are hearing is out of context, altered by the messenger, and only one side of the story.

Good group decisions are built on true understanding and true understanding comes straight from the source.

3 thoughts on “Direct communication

  1. Loved the last sentence of this one: Good decisions are built on true understanding and true understanding comes straight from the source.

  2. Your timing is impeccable! I had a few direct communications with people in the past week. This kind of communicating is key to true understanding and for me, peace of mind. If I don’t do this, I notice how my mind wants to fill in the blank with assumptions, speculations, judegments, blame, etc. I do know that I will never know the truth unless I ask directly. I am clearer on my choices these days. Thanks, Craig.

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