Tips, Videos, Handouts

You decide how

Good Group Tips

In principle, when everyone has the same objective or interest, details are best decided closest to the action, on the ground floor, on the front line, by the people with the most information. It works well to give a group a task and let them decide how to get it done.

Practical Tip: If giving a task to a group, be clear on the objectives. If receiving a task as a group, be clear on the objectives. When everyone is clear on the objectives let each person do what they do best. Let a group split up responsibilities for themselves.  Let them change responsibilities, including leadership, according to task.

Don’t decide too much. Leave how-to details for the doers.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Two Conditions for Conflict Resolution

When a group wants to address and resolve a conflict, there are two conditions that need to be met right from the start. One, the people involved have to want a peaceful resolution, and two, they have to agree on the conflict resolution process.

In this three-minute video Craig explains how without meeting these conditions, the conflict resolution process is not likely to succeed.

 

This video has captions. To see them, click CC on the video screen.

Here’s what Craig says in the video

Hi everybody. Hey it’s Craig Freshley here. Sometimes, there is a pretty significant conflict in a group or between two groups of people and it’s got to be addressed. You might even decide to get a mediator or some professional help with resolving a conflict. But I’m here to say that before you try anything, if you really want a peaceful resolution, you’ve got to meet two conditions right from the get-go.

Number one, the people involved have to want a peaceful resolution, and number two, the people involved have to agree on the process.

Let me explain each of these a little more.

The people have got to want a peaceful resolution. Each individual has got to want resolution more than they want to get their own way. They’ve got to be voluntary participants. They can’t just be doing this because somebody’s making them do it; they can’t be going through the motions hoping that they’re going to get their way but if they don’t they will undermine it later. If you don’t have this condition met from the outset — everybody wanting a peaceful resolution — you’re likely not to achieve it at the end.

Second thing: Everybody agree on the process. And there’s three parts of that. One part is: What is the problem you’re trying to solve or the question you’re trying to answer? Make sure that everyone agrees to that right from the beginning. Actually write the words and get buy-in from everybody on the words. Number two: How is the decision ultimately going to be made? Does every single person have to agree? Is it okay at the end of the process to take a vote and everybody agrees that majority decides? Or maybe you leave the final decision up to a third party arbiter – maybe it’s a judge. But whatever it is, make sure that everybody from the beginning knows how the decision is going to be made at the end and agrees to respect that. Third thing about the process: that everybody is on board with the facilitator. If there is a third-party facilitator, everybody has got to believe in that person, have faith in that person, and believe that that person is going to be neutral and stick up for their interests in terms of process.

If you don’t have buy-in and acceptance of these initial conditions, you’re not likely to achieve peaceful resolution at the end.

Thanks for listening everybody. Good luck with your conflict resolution and helping your group make good decisions.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.

Head, heart, and hands

Good Group Tips

In principle, if we want our group decisions to be creative—that is, result in new and better ways of doing things—we need to draw on all our resources and blend them in new ways. Typical meetings are structured to put our heads together and, indeed, our knowledge and ideas are a tremendous resource. But we have more. Why not go further and put our hearts together, share our feelings, stories, fears, and passions? Further still, why not put our hands together and do physical activities as a group?

A group decision process that includes intellectual exchange, sharing from the heart, and hands-on physical activity is most likely to yield creative results.

Practical Tip: Don’t just do brainstorming, try heartstorming. Don’t just sit and talk about stuff together, get up and do stuff together, with your hands.

If you want truly creative group decisions, share ideas, feelings, and activities…all three.

– Craig Freshley

Click here for one-page PDF of this Tip, a great way to print or share.

Put the Tips in action for your group. Click here to learn about Craig’s Keynotes and Seminars.
1 2 3 99